Monday, May 05, 2008

Mathematics in Industry -- The final TGG lecture of the semester

The fact that this is the last time that I will try to \sout{emotionally black mail} persuade (like it ever works though!) you to attend a Galois Group lecture this semester, must come as a relief. However, the persuasion must go on for a few more days and I would be delighted if you could make it to the final lecture this Wednesday.

The lecture will be at 1:10-2:00pm in the Alan Turing building, room G205. The Head of School-- Professor Paul Glendinning has kindly agreed to do the introductions this week too, and it will be a stinker of a lecture if there are only 10 people present. Yes, I have my reasons to be negative (the Tweenie's attitude has passed onto me). However, as always I am trying to be hopeful that we can get at least 30 attending; and you could do your part and make that possible. I actually don't know what to expect from this Wednesday after the previous lectures attendance. On Friday I exhausted myself by sticking all the posters up by 5pm, but I can always recover once this Wednesday is over.

Someone once commented (I think) that not many lectures are geared towards applied maths. Well this ones for you then (and everyone else who felt that way)!

OK to the abstract then...

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Mathematics in Industry by Professor Bill Lionheart.
Wednesday 7th May 2008, 1:10-2:00pm (Alan Turing Building G205)


Abstract
How does mathematics help in practical problems in industry and commerce? How do mathematicians work with industry? What job opportunities are there for maths graduates where they will use their mathematical skills?

I will illustrate the answer to this with some examples of work I have done with industry including such things as diverse as helping a steel mill, devising new types of computer display, improving medical imaging and working on airport security. I will tell you about some maths graduates I know and the work they do, and some of the impact of maths in our daily life.

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Since this is the last lecture of the season, I was thinking of getting more refreshments than normal! (Though I'm not sure whether they will be well received...) Hope to see you on Wednesday then!

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