Saturday, April 26, 2008

Free Software in Ethics and Practice" lecture by Richard Stallman

I don't understand why so many of these lectures start so late!


'Free Software in Ethics and Practice'

Speaker: Richard Stallman

Date/Time: Thursday 1 May 2008 - talk starts at 6.45pm (ends approx. 8.30pm) with refreshments from 6.15pm.

Venue: Room D1, Renold Building, The University of Manchester,
Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3BB.

About the event

Richard Stallman will speak about the Free Software Movement, which campaigns for freedom so that computer users can cooperate to control their own computing activities. The Free Software Movement developed the GNU operating system, often erroneously referred to as
Linux, specifically to establish these freedoms.

About the speaker

Richard Stallman launched the development of the GNU operating system in 1984. GNU is free software: everyone has the freedom to copy it and redistribute it, as well as to make changes either large or small. The GNU/Linux system, basically the GNU operating system with Linux added, is used on tens of millions of computers today. Stallman has received the ACM Grace Hopper Award, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Pioneer award, and the the Takeda Award for Social/Economic Betterment, as well as several honorary doctorates.

Note

This is event is free of charge and is organised in association with the Manchester branches of the BCS and IET. There is no need to book a place - just turn up on the night.

2 comments:

KTC said...

I've been to a version of this when it was held in Edinburgh a few years back. :)

It's so late because people in the real world (outside academia) have jobs and then need time to physically travel to the lecture hall. ;)

Beans said...

Hey KTC,

How was it?

An erm... *cough* Rhetorical question *cough* :D

Hehe, I'm only kidding. I wasn't going to attend it as it is because of another engagement; however, why would people in the real world want to attend a lecture?!

BTW I must confess that I had never heard of Richard Stallman before this, and it is only after my conversation with Prof. Borovik that I googled him!